Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (2023)

Biting into a ripe peach is an experience. The bright sweetness of the flesh and the tangy skin are unbeatable, especially if you can find one fresh off the tree. That’s why growing peaches is so rewarding. It’s one of those fruits that the grocery store version can’t replicate.

Unfortunately, if you live in a cold climate like me, it’s tough to find perfect peaches, even in season. If you think that you’re stuck with cardboard-tasting peaches forever because you live in a cold climate, though, think again. Peachtrees aren’t only suited for growing in warm southern climates. It’s, in fact, possible to grow this delicious stone fruit in zones as cold as 4 and 5.

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (1)

It’s true that peaches are typically grown in warm areas. There’s a reason the state of Georgia is associated with this orange-colored fruit. Peaches thrive in warm weather and full sunlight. They’re also usually sensitive to cold snaps. Our growing guide explores how to grow and care for peach trees in addition to a section that covers the different fruit tree varieties and which types are best for cold climates.

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (2)

Peachtree Varieties

As with any fruit tree, it’s crucial to pick a variety that suits your zone and climate. With peaches, choosing a peach for your area depends on the number of chill hours it requires (explained in the section ‘Growing Peaches’).

Picking a hardy tree variety is critical if you’re planning to plant a peach tree in a location with harsh winters, but keeping your tree alive also involves selecting the right area for planting and preventing exposure to rapidly changing temperatures. Keeping a peach tree alive is more difficult in colder zones, but it’s possible. If you choose to experiment, procure hardy stock from a reputable nursery and inquire whether they have any growing tips.

Peach Categories

Peaches come in several different stone categories: clingstone, freestone, or semi-freestone. This designation refers to the relationship between the flesh and the fruit’s stone.

Clingstone: It’s tougher to separate the flesh from the pit from these types of peaches. You should eat clingstone peaches fresh.

Freestone: With these types of peaches, you can easily remove the pit from the flesh. These are ideal in cooking.

Semi-freestone: This type of peach is a versatile hybrid with a pit that’s easy to remove. It’s excellent eaten fresh and used in recipes.

Cold Hardy Varieties

Peach varieties suitable for zone 5 (and in some cases zone 4) include:

  • Canadian Harmony – This variety produces large, yellow fruits with freestone flesh. The fruit, which is perfect for freezing, ripens mid-to-late August.
  • Glohaven – Glohaven produces yellow and blush, fuzz-free fruit with freestone flesh. The fruits ripen in early-to-mid August.
  • Reliance – This type produces golden, medium-sized fruits on a small tree. The fruits are ready by mid-July.
  • Contender – Contender is a hardy tree that produces medium-to-large fruit. It’s disease-resistant and ripens in mid-August.
  • Madison – This variety has deep yellow flesh and bright red skin. It’s hardy, a vigorous producer, and ready to pluck in late August.
  • Redhaven – The fruit of the Redhaven peach is almost fuzz-free and incredibly delicious. It’s disease-resistant and heavy-bearing.

Dwarf Peaches

If you spot the word ‘compact’ in front of a fruit tree name, it’s a good bet that it’s a dwarf-type.

  • El Dorado – This variety is compact, with medium-sized fruits that ripen in early summer.
  • Redwing – Redwing produces fruits with a luscious white flesh and yellow-red skin.
  • Orange Cling – As the name implies, this is a clingstone peach with blush-red skin and golden flesh. It’s ready to harvest mid-to-late summer.
  • Halloween – As the name indicates, this dwarf variety is ready to harvest in the fall.
  • Redhaven – Like its bigger sibling, Redhaven is hardy in colder climates in addition to being compact.

Disease Resistant Varieties

If you’ve struggled with diseases in your garden, you may want to consider a hardy, disease-resistant peach.

  • Clayton – Clayton is resistant to both peach leaf curl and bacterial spot.
  • Champion – Champion is a white-fleshed variety that is intensely sweet. It’s resistant to bacterial leaf spot.
  • Contender – Beyond growing in cold climates, this variety is also incredibly hardy and disease resistant.
  • Elberta – Elberta is an incredibly popular variety that comes in both standard and dwarf varieties. It’s insect and disease resistant.

Ornamental Peach Varieties

Peach trees don’t only produce tasty fruits – they’re beautiful when they are blossoming as well. Some peach varieties are cultivated for their ornamental value. These are trees that are grown primarily for their attractive blossoms, and the fruit is edible but isn’t that tasty.

(Video) How to Grow Peaches Organically - Complete Growing Guide

Varieties include the Double Red Flowering peach, Icicle peach, and Peppermint peach.

Growing Peaches

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (3)

Growing Zones

Ripening occurs when temperatures are at least 75°F. Peach trees prefer warm temperatures throughout the growing season and do not fare well in places with cool, wet summers. Most peaches grow in zones 5-9, but you can find some varieties that will thrive in zone 4.

Lifespan

One thing to note about peaches is that unlike other types of fruit trees — like pears — they’re not long-lived plants. Even if planted in an ideal location under ideal circumstances, a peach tree won’t be around forever. Most trees will stick around for a little over a decade or two before they stop producing.

Sun Requirements

You can grow peach trees in partial shade, but they won’t produce as much fruit as they would in full sun. If you want a full harvest, plant in full sun, with at least 6 hours of direct light a day. If you can’t use up all those peaches, part shade might be the answer.

Soil Requirements

Keep your peach tree away from puddled areas to prevent root rot. The location where you plant a peach tree should have well-drained soil with a pH of around 6.0-7.0. Peaches need well-drained, fertile soil with lots of well-rotted organic matter added.

Planting

When to plant your new peach tree? Get your plant in the ground during the early spring or late winter, as soon as it’s possible to work the soil. Don’t forget to water immediately after planting. Hold off on fertilizing your young peach tree to prevent stressing the plant, though.

In the first year of growth, remove blossoms to reroute energy use to the production of a healthy root system. Do the same in the following year. A peach tree will be ready for picking in its third year.

Pollinating

You don’t need multiple peach trees to enjoy the fruit. Most varieties are self-fertile, though check your variety to be sure.

Container Growing

Are you wondering if you may grow peaches in containers? Absolutely! In fact, if you’re cursed with harsh winters, you may prefer to grow container peaches and bring your plants inside to keep them from being exposed to a prolonged freeze, which can kill your peach trees.

Pick dwarf varieties suitable for containers, so that they won’t outgrow your living space. You’ll need a large pot to accommodate this type of fruit tree — at least 36 inches in diameter. Once winter arrives, your heat-loving trees still need a period of hibernation in order to set fruit the following year, so keep them relegated to a cool spot like a garage.

Spacing

Trees grow up to 25-feet tall, though dwarf peaches are much smaller and won’t surpass 10-feet in height.

If you plan on planting a few peach trees, you’ll need to space out trees accordingly. Dwarf trees can be planted closer together, but regular-sized varieties should be planted at least 18-inches apart.

Chilling

A hibernation period is required to produce fruit. Different peach varieties require different ‘chill hours.’ The number of chilling hours required by peachtree varieties varies considerably. Some require less than 100 hours at temps below 45°F, while others need well over 800 chilling hours.

It’s critical to pick a peach tree type with chill hours that are compatible with your climate. Too few chill hours will ruin your chances of getting fruit.

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Caring for Your Peach Tree

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (4)

How should you care for your peach tree as it grows throughout its lifetime? Read on to find out.

Watering

Water frequently and evenly, especially while your tree is still young. Avoid overwatering, which can lead to disease. Plan to water every 10 to 14 days during warm, dry periods.

Fertilizing

Feed an established tree with a balanced fertilizer during the growing season. Give a young tree 3/4 of a pound of nitrogen once in the spring and again in the summer. After the third year, give trees 1 pound of nitrogen each year. Avoid fertilizing when fruits are growing or a month before the first frost.

Pruning

It’s essential to prune peach trees each year to prevent overgrowth and to encourage fruiting and yield. It’s fine to prune your peach tree anytime, but if you have a lot to pick off, save that job until the fall. Always get rid of broken and dead branches first and then remove suckers at the base of the tree.

Get rid of weak branches incapable of holding heavy fruit set, too. Prune off branches that are too close together to promote air circulation and prevent knicks that may leave room for disease and pest infiltration.

Proper regular pruning will promote healthy growth, fruit set, and will make it easier to maintain your tree’s health from year to year. When fruit sets, it’s also essential to thin fruits early in the season. Removing some of the young peaches will allow other fruit to grow bigger.

Peach Problems and Solutions

The heat-loving peach tree requires lots of love and care and is susceptible to a multitude of pests. The key is keeping a close eye on your trees to spot problems as soon as they appear.

Pests that invade branches may be controlled by promptly removing infected branches. Beetles and mites are easily dislodged by shaking the tree and cleaning up the debris. Avoid being too rough with young trees. Diseases are often a problem for peach trees grown in cooler, moist climates. Pests also transmit disease that infects peach trees.

Bacterial Leaf Spot

This disease is caused by a bacteria that infects fruits and leaves, causing lesions on the fruit and shot holes on the leaves. To prevent, pick a resistant variety and make sure your tree is healthy so that it can resist this disease.

Crown Gall

Crown gall is caused by a bacteria, causing galls on roots and the lower part of the tree stem. The galls prevent the tree from getting the nutrients it needs. Avoid damaging your tree while pruning or mowing and destroy any tree that becomes infected.

Peach Scab

Peach scab is caused by a fungus that attacks small fruits with freckle-like dark spots. To prevent it, keep peach trees well pruned and apply fungicides every two weeks during the bloom season.

Brown Rot

Brown rot is one of the worst diseases that can impact your growing peaches because it’s common and devastating. It causes flowers and fruits to rot and spreads easily.

To control brown rot, collect and destroy diseased fruits and spray plants with a fungicide every two weeks during the flowering period.

Rust

Peach rust is caused by a fungus and is typically found in warmer climates, where it spreads through the air via spores. Keep trees well pruned and avoid overhead watering. You can also use a fungicide to help control this disease.

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Leaf Curl

This fungus attacks fruit, blossoms and leaves, causing infected leaves to turn yellow and drop from the tree. If this disease gets bad enough, it can dramatically reduce your yield. Apply a good fungicide before bud break to control it.

Root Rot

Root rot is a fungal disease that attacks peaches. It causes cankers at the root of the tree and can kill off your plant. You can’t get rid of it, so prevent it by planting in a well-drained area and don’t overwater. Sterilize tools in between use. If your tree is infected, remove soil from the base of the tree to stop the disease from progressing and spray the trunk with a copper fungicide.

Leafroller

Leaf rollers are small caterpillars that, as the name implies, roll the leaves of your peach tree to create a little shelter. You can pick the pests off of your tree or use a pesticide to control

Oriental Fruit Moth

Oriental fruit moth larvae tunnel through the stem of the plant and exit near the pit. Use pheromone traps to capture the moths before they can lay eggs.

Aphids

Aphids attack practically every plant in the garden, and peaches are no exception. You’ll know you have them if your peach tree leaves thicken, turn yellow and fall. You’ll also see the honeydew left behind by the pests, which can attract diseases.

Use a neem oil-based spray to control aphids.

Why is my peach tree not sprouting now that the weather has warmed?

This either means that your tree is dead or it’s still dormant. If it didn’t receive enough chill hours throughout the winter or the winter was unseasonably warm, your tree may not come out of dormancy. Root rot is another potential culprit for your tree’s lackluster appearance.

Companions for Peaches

Peach trees make great companions for a range of plants, including:

  • Basil
  • Tansy
  • Southernwood
  • Garlic
  • Peas
  • Beans
  • Clover
  • Marigold
  • Chamomile
  • Comfrey

Don’t plant peaches with:

  • Apple
  • Corn
  • Sweet Potato
  • Cowpeas
  • Potato
  • Tomato
  • Raspberry

Harvesting Peaches

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (5)

Peach trees are ready to produce 3-4 years after planting. Harvest time is mid-summer and late-summer. Fruit typically appears between 3 and 5 months after flowers start to bloom and become pollinated. It’s best to let the fruit ripen on the tree instead of picking it early. The taste will remain superior this way. Peaches are ready for picking when they’re slightly soft to the touch and easily twist off the branch.

Eat peaches quickly after picking. They taste best when they’re fresh picked. Store in a cool place for about a week. Use freestone type peaches for baking or preserving.

If you’ve never tried growing peaches before, do you plan on adding them to the mix for the next growing season? Which kind of peach tree variety do you have in mind? Let us know in the comments.

Growing Peaches: The Complete Guide to Plant, Care, and Harvest Peaches (6)
(Video) How to Grow SWEET JUICY Peaches!

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(Video) How to Care for Peach Trees in the Home Landscape & Grow Bushels of Peach Fruit

FAQs

What month is best to plant peach trees? ›

Peach trees should be planted while they're dormant—typically in late winter or early spring (depending on climate). In regions where the ground freezes during winter, hold off on planting until the soil has thawed and the ground is no longer waterlogged from snowmelt or heavy spring rains.

How long to peaches take to grow? ›

Growing a peach tree from seed takes three to four years to produce fruit, so a quicker solution is to purchase a young tree from your local nursery to plant in your home garden. 1. Choose a type of peach tree that grows in your climate.

What is the best fertilizer for peaches? ›

A good fertilizer for peach trees is one that has an even balance of the three major nutrients, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. For this reason, a good peach tree fertilizer is a 10-10-10 fertilizer, but any balanced fertilizer, such as 12-12-12 or 20-20-20, will do.

Where do peaches grow best? ›

The top four states in peach production are California, South Carolina, Georgia and New Jersey. In 2017, California supplied nearly 56 percent of the United States fresh peach crop and more than 96 percent of processed peaches (NASS, 2021).

Are peach trees easy to grow? ›

For those who are new to growing their own fruit, though, peaches can be a little trickier than some other fruits. Are peach trees hard to grow? The answer really depends on how much effort you're willing to put in to keep your peach tree healthy.

How much water does a peach tree need? ›

Peach trees require regular watering for an average of three times per week as the young tree gets established. As time goes on and the tree takes hold in the ground, the young tree should be watered-in well on a less frequent basis, soaking the soil generously only when the soil is relatively dry.

How do you make a peach tree sweeter fruit? ›

How To Thin Peaches: To improve fruit size and sweetness - YouTube

Do peach trees produce fruit every year? ›

The first thing you need to know is that peach trees are self-fertile. This means that they only need one variety to produce fruit. That's it! But you may be surprised to learn that peaches can produce fruit every year with only one variety.

How long does a peach tree live? ›

Fact or Fiction: The average lifespan of a peach and nectarine tree is 12 years. Fact. Unlike permanent crops that last for 40 years, peach and nectarine trees only last for about 12 years. Year 1 though 3 the tree is not producing any fruit but is concentrated on growing a good base for peach production years.

Is Epsom salt good for peach trees? ›

The answer is yes. This mineral can play an important role in the growth of your peach tree. You can use this mineral for transplanting, which is the process of moving a plant or tree from one location to another.

Is coffee grounds good for peach trees? ›

You can use a full bag of ground coffee, which will provide your peach tree with the nutrients it needs to grow healthy and lush. The best way to compost them is during fall and spring. Coffee grounds are a good fertilizer for your peach tree.

Is Miracle-Gro good for peach trees? ›

Tomato, Fruit and Vegetables Plant Food by Miracle-Gro – Best Overall Peach Tree Fertilizer. This plant food is filled with natural materials that instantly act as food for the microbes living in the soil.

How do I grow bigger peaches? ›

How to Grow Bigger Peaches at Home - YouTube

How much fertilizer does a peach tree need? ›

About 6 weeks after planting, apply one pound of a 10-10-10 fertilizer with nitrogen. In the second year, feed the tree with ¾ pound of fertilizer in the spring, and another ¾ pound in early summer.

Do you need two peach trees to produce fruit? ›

Cross-Pollination

Most peach trees are self-pollinating; however, additional nearby peach trees (within 100 feet) of a different variety can improve fruit-set. Almost all of Stark Bro's peach trees are self-pollinating, meaning your mature tree will bear fruit without requiring another peach variety's pollen.

What is the easiest peach to grow? ›

After a decades of cultivation in search of a low-maintenance peach tree, Curlfree was finally developed as one of the easiest peaches to grow. Similar to Frost, it withstands quite cold temperatures for a peach, while also maintaining its status as the most disease and pest-resistant peach tree yet discovered.

What is the easiest fruit tree to grow? ›

Many people consider pear trees to be the easiest fruit tree to grow on your own. Specifically, Asian pear tree varieties are well-known as the perfect fruit trees for beginners because of how simple they are to take care of and how much fruit they produce with little extra effort.

Can you start a peach tree from a peach seed? ›

Definitely. You can grow pretty much any fruit tree from seed. The thing to keep in mind is that peach seeds need cold stratification to germinate.

Should I water my peach tree every day? ›

Peach trees do not need lots of water every day; however, if you discover that your soil or your location's environment require more frequent watering to avoid drought-stress to your peach trees, adjust your watering schedule accordingly.

Can you overwater a peach tree? ›

Overwatering can also lead to gummosis, which is a fungus that kills peach trees. The sap will ooze out of the trunk and can destroy individual branches, as well as the whole tree. While you should always water your peach trees during dry weather, you can also keep the trunk dry during the initial months.

How do you tell if a peach tree is overwatered? ›

Signs of waterlogged peach trees include color changes in the leaves from healthy green to yellow or even a deep red or purple. The leaves may then begin to shed. Ultimately, the roots will die. When investigated, the dead roots will look black or dark purple on the inside and give off a terrible smell.

How many peaches should be on a branch? ›

A general rule of thumb is to leave an average of 6 to 8 inches between fruit (the larger spacing for earlier or hard-to-size varieties). Two or three peaches can be left clustered if there is enough additional limb space to support their growth. Keep the largest fruit on a limb, even if they are clustered.

When should you trim peach trees? ›

1 Ideally, you should prune peach trees annually in spring, just as the buds swell and begin to turn pink. It's better to prune a little too late than too early. However, you can remove shoots developing in the center of the tree at any time since these will block sun and air from getting to the fruits.

Why are the peaches falling off my tree? ›

Late frost or even unusually cold, but not freezing, temperatures can result in a peach tree dropping fruit. High humidity as well as excessive spring heat can produce the same effect. Lack of sunlight from too many cloudy days can cause peach tree fruit drop as well by depleting carbohydrate availability.

How many peaches does one tree produce? ›

A mature peach tree will typically yield between 44 and 66 lbs (20 and 30 kg) per season according to a study by the University of Egypt. This equates to approximately 250 to 270 peaches per year.

How do I protect my peach trees from bugs? ›

How to Keep Insects From Growing in Peach Trees - YouTube

Can an apple tree pollinate a peach tree? ›

Can apple and peach trees pollinate each other? Yes, it is possible to pollinate two different apple and peach trees by hand. The problem is that not all apple varieties are compatible with one another. The most commonly used apples are triploids, which need another fruit tree to produce a healthy crop.

What happens to a peach tree after 12 years? ›

A peach tree can live anywhere from 10 to twenty years. The fruit will start growing in the third season. During this time, it will continue to produce fruit until it reaches around 12 or fifteen years old. After that, it will slowly slow down and produce less fruit.

How big is a 2 year old peach tree? ›

TREE SIZE: 2-year-old tree that is approximately 4-5 feet tall. ESTIMATED CHILLING REQUIREMENTS (BELOW 45 DEGREES): 900-950 hours. USDA PLANT HARDINESS ZONES: 3-7.

How do you prune a peach tree? ›

Pruning a Mature Peach Tree - YouTube

Can I spray Epsom salt on fruit trees? ›

Epsom salts can be applied to pome fruit trees either directly to the soil in dry form or as a foliar spray. The Epsom Salt Council recommends mixing 1/2 cup Epsom salt with water for every 500 feet of soil you need to cover. They suggest applying the mixture each time you irrigate around your fruit trees.

Can I sprinkle Epsom salt around plants? ›

If the soil becomes depleted of magnesium, adding Epsom salt will help; and since it poses little danger of overuse like most commercial fertilizers, you can use it safely on nearly all your garden plants.

Should I remove peach leaf curl leaves? ›

Economic importance. If uncontrolled, leaf curl is very destructive. It can destroy the new leaves in spring, cause shoot dieback and loss of crop. If unchecked over several years, the disease can gradually weaken the tree until it dies.

Can you use Miracle Grow on fruit trees? ›

Miracle-Gro has tree spikes specially formulated for trees, shrubs, evergreens, fruit, citrus, and palm trees. They should be used annually, in the spring and early fall, for a continuous release of nutrients.

What is the best time to fertilize fruit trees? ›

Spring is the best time for fertilizing fruit trees, because that's when they need plenty of energy to push out new leaves and nurture baby fruits.

How do you water a peach tree? ›

On average, 1 and 1.5 inches of water per week will provide sufficient water for a mature tree. If there is not enough rainfall, supplemental irrigation is needed; consider watering them deeply, two or three times per week. Spreading mulch around the tree in a depth of 2-4 inches will help to conserve soil moisture.

What fertilizer should I use on fruit trees? ›

Fruit trees prefer an organic, high nitrogen fertilizer. Blood meal, soybean meal, composted chicken manure, cottonseed meal, and feather meal are all good, organic nitrogen sources. There are also specially formulated fruit tree fertilizers.

What is the best soil for peach trees? ›

Peach trees cannot survive in waterlogged soil, so up to two feet (0.5 m.) of sandy, loamy, fertile topsoil works best, even if the subsoil contains a bit more clay. The best soil for peach trees is ideally in the 6.5 to 7.0 pH range.

What do I add to soil when planting fruit trees? ›

Improve soil with a 50/50 blend of Miracle-Gro® Garden Soil for Trees & Shrubs and native soil. Support each young fruit tree with 3 stakes so it will grow tall and straight. Until your fruit tree is established, water deeply (about 2 feet) every week and add a 3-inch layer of mulch to help maintain soil moisture.

How do you maintain a peach tree? ›

How to Grow Peach Trees : How to Take Care of Peach Trees - YouTube

How deep do peach tree roots grow? ›

Peach trees' roots are relatively shallow, as they aren't invasive. Their deepest branches can only reach about three feet down, which is enough for them to find water. Because of this, they are often used for landscaping, and they require at least ten to twenty feet of space.

Why are my peaches not sweet? ›

Your Peaches Are Not Fully Ripened

Peaches like that are not typically fully ripened. A ripe peach is slightly soft and very aromatic, much like how a pineapple is when it's ripe.

What do you put on a peach tree? ›

Apply Spinosad, a natural bacterial insecticide, if caterpillars or peach twig borers are a problem. After most petals have dropped: (Also known as petal fall or shuck) Spray peach trees with a copper fungicide, or use a combination spray that controls both pests and diseases.

How do you prune a 3 year old peach tree? ›

How to Prune a 3rd-year Peach or Stonefruit Tree in Early Spring

How do you make fertilizer for fruit trees? ›

Pile 6 inches of dry grass, dead leaves or other similar dried plant products in the area. Flatten it out as you add it, so that it does not mound. Put 3 inches of horse, cow, sheep or goat manure on top of the dry material. Add another 3 inches of other green matter, like vegetable peelings.

How long does a peach tree take to bear fruit? ›

Growing a peach tree from seed takes three to four years to produce fruit, so a quicker solution is to purchase a young tree from your local nursery to plant in your home garden. 1. Choose a type of peach tree that grows in your climate.

What month do peach trees bloom? ›

Flowering starts in February or March and fruit ripens as early as May and as late as the end of September, depending on the variety and local weather conditions. Peaches produce flowers and fruit on twigs which are one year old, and pruning out old wood is important for keeping a tree productive.

How do you make fruit trees produce more fruit? ›

5 Great Ways to get MORE Fruit from your Fruit Trees - YouTube

Do you need 2 peach trees to produce fruit? ›

Cross-Pollination

Most peach trees are self-pollinating; however, additional nearby peach trees (within 100 feet) of a different variety can improve fruit-set. Almost all of Stark Bro's peach trees are self-pollinating, meaning your mature tree will bear fruit without requiring another peach variety's pollen.

What kind of soil do peach trees need? ›

Peaches prefer slightly acid soil (pH 6.0-6.8) and thrive in lightweight loamy, well-draining soil. It is vital to not plant peach trees in low spots in the landscape where water pools, as this can contribute to problems like root rot, which can cause the demise of your tree.

How do you plant a peach tree in the ground? ›

Planting a Peach Tree - YouTube

Do peach trees produce fruit every year? ›

The first thing you need to know is that peach trees are self-fertile. This means that they only need one variety to produce fruit. That's it! But you may be surprised to learn that peaches can produce fruit every year with only one variety.

How old does a peach tree have to be to bear fruit? ›

When grown from seed, peach trees take at least three to four years to produce fruit. Purchasing a young tree means you can enjoy a harvest sooner. Plant your peach tree during late winter or early spring, during its dormancy period.

Can an apple tree pollinate a peach tree? ›

Can apple and peach trees pollinate each other? Yes, it is possible to pollinate two different apple and peach trees by hand. The problem is that not all apple varieties are compatible with one another. The most commonly used apples are triploids, which need another fruit tree to produce a healthy crop.

When should peach trees be pruned? ›

1 Ideally, you should prune peach trees annually in spring, just as the buds swell and begin to turn pink. It's better to prune a little too late than too early. However, you can remove shoots developing in the center of the tree at any time since these will block sun and air from getting to the fruits.

What fertilizer is good for fruit trees? ›

Fruit trees prefer an organic, high nitrogen fertilizer. Blood meal, soybean meal, composted chicken manure, cottonseed meal, and feather meal are all good, organic nitrogen sources. There are also specially formulated fruit tree fertilizers.

What mulch is best for peach trees? ›

Mulch yearly with either wood chips or partially composted sawdust. Plants should be mulched yearly to maintain a 4 foot wide strip at least 6 inches deep. Apples, pears, peaches, plums and cherries. Tree fruit should be mulched to the drip line with 6 to 8 inches of straw or hay in May.

How deep should a hole be for a peach tree? ›

For bare root trees, soak the roots for six to twelve hours before planting. Dig your planting hole a few inches (7.5 cm.) deeper than and twice as wide as the tree's root ball or root system. If your tree is grafted, make sure the bud union is planted a couple inches (5 cm.)

What fruit trees should I plant in pairs? ›

What Fruit Trees Should Be Planted in Pairs? Apples, apricots, pears, sweet cherries, and plums have mostly self-unfruitful varieties and should be grown with other varieties of the same species.

Do peach trees have deep roots? ›

Peach trees' roots are relatively shallow, as they aren't invasive. Their deepest branches can only reach about three feet down, which is enough for them to find water. Because of this, they are often used for landscaping, and they require at least ten to twenty feet of space.

How long do peach trees live? ›

Fact or Fiction: The average lifespan of a peach and nectarine tree is 12 years. Fact. Unlike permanent crops that last for 40 years, peach and nectarine trees only last for about 12 years. Year 1 though 3 the tree is not producing any fruit but is concentrated on growing a good base for peach production years.

How many peaches does one tree produce? ›

A mature peach tree will typically yield between 44 and 66 lbs (20 and 30 kg) per season according to a study by the University of Egypt. This equates to approximately 250 to 270 peaches per year.

How do I grow bigger peaches? ›

How to Grow Bigger Peaches at Home - YouTube

How do I protect my peach trees from bugs? ›

How to Keep Insects From Growing in Peach Trees - YouTube

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